Home
Business Guide
 
simplicable technology guide   »  cio   »  4 contenders for cio

The 4 Contenders to be Your Next CIO

        posted by , March 11, 2013

When your organization looks internally for a new CIO there are four usual suspects:

1. IT Directors

IT Directors are the most likely internal candidates for the CIO position. Usually, it's the director who has staked out the most IT real estate who gets the job.

2. Chief Architect or Enterprise Architect

The Chief Architect has a reasonable shot at the title. Especially in cases where he/she has become a trusted advisor of the incumbent CIO and/or the CEO.

3. Other CxO

Often other CxO aren't that interested in the CIO role.

The CIO is perhaps the most thankless and challenging of the CxO positions. For example, CIOs are by far the most likely CxO to be fired.

Some CxO change positions frequently in preparation for the CEO role (an ideal CEO candidate has been head of sales, CFO, COO and CIO).

4. Business Directors

High profile directors in business operations sometimes have their eye on the CIO role.


8 Shares Google Twitter Facebook



Related Articles



Enterprise Architecture
How to architect an organization.




Imagine your hardcore IT geek talking to a company executive. What would they talk about?

Understand the threats to your organization.

Explaining complex business and technical concepts in layman's terms.

CxO level executives are demanding metrics for EA — can you deliver?


Recently on Simplicable


SOA Guide

posted by John Spacey
Our collection of SOA architecture resources and tools.

Build Your Own Enterprise SOA Marketplace

posted by John Spacey
3 approaches to SOA reuse.

3 Big Data Bullies

posted by Anna Mar
Like any powerful new tool, big data can either be used to improve life or to make life worse.

IT ROI is Fading Fast as a Measure of IT Success

posted by Anna Mar
Somebody tell the CFO — IT ROI has gone the way of the dinosaurs.

Sitemap













about     contact     sitemap     privacy     terms of service     copyright