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The Sinking Enterprise Architect

        posted by , March 31, 2011

Some Enterprise Architects (EAs) can't resist getting involved in solution architecture or infrastructure planning — the sinking EAs.

There are several motivations for EAs to sink:

1. Pressure to contribute to solutions for important projects
2. Refusing solution work often seen as lazy
3. Solution work can lead to personal recognition
4. Solution work is easier than tackling EA problems
5. EAs with a background in solution architecture or infrastructure — old habits die hard

Whatever the reasons, sinking EAs are bad for any enterprise architecture program:

1. Sends the wrong message about EA
2. EA work gets neglected
3. Sinking EAs often have trouble thinking like a EA

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